Blood Borne Virus Testing

Blood borne viruses (BBVs) like hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV are a serious public health concern. It is crucial that those in high-risk groups such as injecting drug users are tested regularly so that appropriate treatment decisions can be made.

When taking whole blood samples, poor venous access and a lack of trained staff can lead to poor screening uptake. Our dried blood spot testing service gives a simple, quick, cost effective method for regular screening whilst increasing uptake in groups where whole blood samples are less popular1.

Features

  • CE marked kit
  • No venous access required
  • Quick and easy sample collection that can be carried out by any trained healthcare professional
  • Only test for the blood borne viruses you need
  • Screen for active hepatitis C virus using PCR without an initial antibody screen
  • Free management information
  • Hepatitis C Antibody
  • Hepatitis C Qualitative PCR
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody
  • HIV Antigen/Antibody

Hepatitis C

Among people who inject psychoactive drugs, such as heroin and mephedrone, around two in five are living with hepatitis C; half of these infections are undiagnosed. About one in 30 of those who inject image and performance enhancing drugs, such as anabolic steroids, are living with hepatitis C.

Around 90% of the hepatitis C infections diagnosed in the UK will have been acquired through injecting drug use. Across the UK, 13,758 hepatitis C infections were diagnosed during 2013. 2

Hepatitis B

Around one in 200 people who have injected psychoactive drugs are living with hepatitis B infection. 3

HIV

Around one in every 100 people who inject drugs is living with HIV. 2

Contact Sales

To learn how Alere Toxicology can build the ideal blood borne virus testing programme for your organisation.

UK public health recommendations

Testing needs to be sustained among those attending specialist services for people who use drugs, and enhanced across the prison estate; the use of newer technologies, like dried blood spot testing, that make testing easier in non - clinical settings should be further expanded throughout the UK.3